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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
years ago, i will say in the air and certainly in temperatures of temperature, but certainly the obama administration that hopes maybe coming out of some of the celebration still in the air here they'll start or try to bring the country together. you mentioned that vice-president biden will be going first, in just a few moments, justice sonia sotomayor will swear him in and he and the president will be at arlington national cemetery laying a wreath at the tomb of unknown and in the blue room hine me on the aren't side because the constitution says he needs to be sworn in on january 20th and the ceremonial stuff will happen on the capitol west front tomorrow. some of the celebration started yesterday, a children's inaugural ball the first lady went to along with dr. jill biden and trying to get folks involved this and also the president and first lady participating in a day of service, they participated in a project here, service project here in washington d.c. and they had a lot of cabinet members, the vice-president and others doing that as well and when the president had a chance to
to washington, d.c. this weekend to attend president obama's second inauguration. among them, a 9-year-old boy from antioch who, as you will see, has a very bright future. he's a fourth grader at cornerstone christian school in antioch. he's an honor roll student and junior olympian. >> i like to play basketball, run track and play football. >> this weekend, he's gonna witness the 50th presidential inauguration in washington, d.c. >> looking forward to meeting new friends. >> he's one of over 300 students invited to be part of the people-to-people ambassador program. his teacher nominated him. >> he's very active. he's always very on his work. he'sdiligent. >> his dad allen told us his son takes his work very seriously. he's even memorized the declaration of independence. and he was some lofty goals. he says some day he would like to be president. but he has some important questions to the person who is currently occupying the white house. [inaudible] >> he might give the president a little work out there playing basketball. this trip was not trip. but he was able to raise over $2700, he colle
after the top of the hour. the election of barak obama guarantees four more years of government growth, many say. that's mostly due to the landmark health care legislation, the affordable care act. as the bureaucracy gets bigger, your coverage could actually get smaller? here to help us understand the new law, betsy mccoy, author of the book" beating observe observe." you've been an advocate of explaining what observe -- obamacare is all about. >> the book is actually a no spin, easy to understand guide for people who know nothing about health insurance or health care except what they've experienced themselves. but there are big changes ahead for everybody. for example, most americans get their health insurance at work, through their own employer or their spouse's employer. but they may be losing that coverage. >> gretchen: why? >> because the law requires, being in 2014, that employers with 50 or more full-time workers, provide coverage. not just any coverage. the government mandated one size fits all plan, which will cost about twice as much as what many employers currently offer. so
said, "man, this pepper shaker is so 16-year-old boy with a cheesy mustache." just saying. neil: as we all know president obama likes whole foods especially the arugula. president's health care law after apologizing calling it fascism. he is still not a fan. co-ceo john mackay would like to leave health care to the private sector but have companies that care about people handle it. that was essentially his new book, consensus. conscious capitalism. all about that. this is the guy all about doing the right thing. john, good to have you. >> thanks, good to be here, neil. neil: we were briefly trying to get to the bottom of the break when you started to getting vocal on these issues. i think you always have been. you have a very strong point of view when it came to the role of government and the private sector. what brought it out or got it really big? was it the campaign? >> i don't think so. i mean, i was very concerned about the health care law. i thought it was going to be bad for business. >> why? >> it will drive up costs. neil: you saw that a lot sooner than a lot of ceos. what got
our particular feelings are. here's another question that we should be asking ourselves now. 40 years from now, historians will be looking back on our time. or 60 years from now. and what will they say about how we responded to this? it's not just about president obama. it's about all of us. >> or how we didn't respond to it. >> we're all on a dock here. and i think that's the question that we have to ask ourselves. and it has to be asked across the political and the cultural spectrum including the people who feel that they have a right to own an assault weapon and the people in their community who feel that they don't have a right to. there has to be this dialogue across the country in small western communities, in the south and in the big cities as well. as reverend al knows, there's no greater carnage from guns than in the inner cities of america. >> absolutely. >> 506 homicides last year in chicago, most of them in the inner city. >> i've just been reading about -- you all remember nickel mines, the shooting there, which was actually a handgun. it highlights -- and that was, i don
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)